D33283

ACADEMY

OV-10A VIETNAM WAR ACADEMY 1:72

OV-10A VIETNAM WAR ACADEMYThe North American OV-10 Bronco is a high-wing twin-engine monoplane military aircraft with COIN (Counter Insurgence, counter-insurgency) tasks produced by the US company North American Aviation in the sixties and seventies and still in service. Its maiden flight was accomplished in July 1965, and 271 examples were immediately ordered between the USAF and US Marine Corps. When the Bronco began to prove obsolete in the early nineties, it was exported to various countries, including Morocco, the Philippines, Indonesia and Venezuela. Comparable only with the FMA IA-58 Pucará, the OV-10 is distinguished by the space created for a team of parachute or disembarkable raiders of your choice, not present in the same Argentine-built role, while the structure guarantees excellent visibility. 1:72 scale

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