D22208

ITALERI

ITALERI 7012 PANZERJG. ELEPHANT Scale 1/72

ITALERI 7012 PANZERJG. ELEPHANT Scale 1/72. Plastic kit to assemble and colour, does not contain glue or colours. Description These vehicles, which mounted a casemate gun, were used extensively by the German Army throughout the Second World War, providing covering fire for infantry and also being used as tank-busters. Several hundred of this particular self-propelled gun - constructed on a Pz.Kpfw. IV tank chassis - were built in several versions that underwent constant armour and gun upgrades to keep pace with the development of enemy weapons.

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PLASTIC SOLDIER PANZER III JLMN – WW2V20018 SCALA 1:72

PLASTIC SOLDIER

PLASTIC SOLDIER PANZER III JLMN – WW2V20018 SCALA 1:72

The PzKpfw III (Panzerkampfwagen III) was a German medium tank of World War II. The first prototypes of the vehicle were made in 1936, and series production continued from 1937 to 1943, ending with the production of approximately 5,800 vehicles. The tank in the E version was powered by a single Maybach HL 120 TRM engine with a capacity of 300 hp. It was armed with a 37 mm KwK 35/36 cannon and two 7.92 mm MG 34 machine guns. placed in the tower. PzKpfw III was the "workhorse" of the German armored forces during World War II and one of the most intensively developed and modernized Wehrmacht tanks. Its mass production began in 1936, and in its course many variations of this tank were created. Chronologically, the first version was version A, armed with a 37 mm cannon and a 230 hp engine. However, already in December 1938, the E version was created, which was the first version produced in large series. It had a new, significantly more powerful engine, a completely new suspension and stronger armor in the front of the turret and hull. Subsequently (from December 1940) it was also armed with a more powerful 50 mm cannon. In March 1940, the G version began to be produced, in which the rear hull and turret armor were strengthened. Soon after, in October 1940, production of the H version began, which from the start was armed with the 50 mm KwK 38 L/42 cannon and had reinforced frontal armor. One of the most produced was the J version, which had armor up to 50 mm thick (then reinforced with aplique plates), and after the experience gained in clashes with the T-34 and KW-1 vehicles - it was intensively rearmed to the KwK 39 L / 60. 50 mm cal. cannon. The last development version was the N version, which was intended to be a support tank for armored grenadiers and was armed with a short-barreled 75 mm gun KwK 37 L/24. Numerous other vehicles were built on the chassis of the PzKpfw III, such as the StuG III assault gun. PzKpfw III tanks were used on almost all fronts of World War II - from the September campaign in 1939, through the campaign in France in 1940, operations Barbarossa and Typhoon in 1941, the Battle of Kursk in 1943, up to the last operations of the German army against the USSR and the Western allies in 1944-1945.
PLASTIC SOLDIER PAK 40 – WW2G20005 SCALA 1:72

PLASTIC SOLDIER

PLASTIC SOLDIER PAK 40 – WW2G20005 SCALA 1:72

2 x Pak-40 anti tank guns, 2 x RSO Raupenschlepper tractors (with 2 cab options and optional canvas tilt) and 16 crew figures. There is also the option to build 2 x 40/04 self-propelled guns. German 7.5 cm Pak 40 (7.5 cm Panzerabwehrkanone 40) anti-tank gun from World War II. Work on this cannon was carried out in 1939-1941 by Krupp and Rheinmetall. A significant acceleration of research work occurred after the start of Operation Barbarossa and the encounter by German armored units of the KW-1 and T-34 tanks. The Pak 40 gun was introduced into line units from the end of 1941. Due to its high parameters, it became the main German anti-tank gun until the end of the war. It was able to engage in firefights with any Soviet and Allied tank, until the appearance of vehicles such as the IS-2, M26 Pershing and Centurion. In the period 1941-1945, over 29,000 of these weapons were produced (including guns installed on tank destroyers). Its main drawback was its relatively high weight, which required the use of an artillery tractor for its transportation. Due to the wide range of ammunition it could fire, it was often used as a field gun. Projectile weights ranged from 4.1 kg to 6.8 kg. Technical data: caliber: 75 mm, weight: 1425 kg, muzzle velocity: 930 m/s (sub-caliber projectile), rate of fire: 14 rounds/min. After the war, the Pak 40 cannon was used in the armies of, among others, Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Finland, Romania and Hungary. RSO (short for: Raupenschlepper Ost) is a German World War II tracked transport vehicle. The first copies of this car appeared in 1942, and series production began shortly thereafter. Over its course, approximately 23,000 vehicles of this type were built. RSO - depending on the version - was powered by a single engine: 85 hp Steyr (RSO/01) or 66 hp Deutz (RSO/03). The RSO was built for the needs of German troops fighting on the Eastern Front, who in the first year of war with the Soviet Union realized the shortcomings of their wheeled transport in the wilds of the country. In order to shorten research and development times, the RSO structure was based on components from proven Steyr 1500 trucks and many elements from German half-track semi-trailers. Ultimately, the RSO had good off-road characteristics, a good payload, but a speed of only 30 km/h. On its basis - in 1943 - a self-propelled gun was also created using the PaK 40 anti-tank gun, named RSO / PAK40.
Italeri 7022 DUKW 2 1/2 ton GMC truck amphibious version "D-Day 80° Anniversary" Scala 1/72

ITALERI

Italeri 7022 DUKW 2 1/2 ton GMC truck amphibious version "D-Day 80° Anniversary" Scala 1/72

Italeri 7022 DUKW 2 1/2 ton GMC truck amphibious version "D-Day 80th Anniversary" Scale 1/72. Plastic kit to assemble, does not contain glue or paint. NEW DECALS FOR 4 VERSIONS. COLOR INSTRUCTIONS. FIGURE NOT INCLUDED. From the American General Motor CCKW-353 2½ t 6x6 tactical transport truck, a special amphibious version was designed and built to meet the logistical needs of the US Army landing forces in order to transfer loads directly and quickly from ships to the beach. The basic components were in fact the same as the GMC road truck with its 4,400 cm3 6-cylinder engine and three differentials with six driving wheels. The DUKW was characterized by a welded hull, to make it amphibious, reinforced by horizontal ribs. Its strong point was its extraordinary versatility and load capacity. In fact, it could carry 2,400 kg of payload or 25 fully equipped men. DUKWs were widely used in all theaters of war by the United States Army, Marines and the armed forces of numerous Allied countries. They made their effective contribution in the landings at Salerno, Anzio, in Normandy during D-Day, in both Utah and Omaha, and on the beaches of the Pacific.
Italeri 7518 M4A3 Sherman SCALA 1/72

ITALERI

Italeri 7518 M4A3 Sherman SCALA 1/72

Italeri 7518 M4A3 Sherman 1/72 SCALE. The M4 Sherman was an American medium tank of World War II. The first prototypes were built in 1941 and series production was carried out in the period 1942-1945. In total, approximately 49,000 copies of this tank of all versions were created, which makes it one of the most produced tanks of the Second World War and the most important tank in the equipment of the Allied armies during this conflict. The M4 Sherman was powered by a single-engine version of the M4A1 Continental R 975 C4 with an output of 400 hp. The vehicle was armed with, depending on the version, a single 75 mm M3 cannon or a 76 mm M1 cannon or a 105 mm M4 howitzer and two 7.62 mm Browning1919A machine guns. The M4 Sherman was developed as a successor to the M2 and M3 tanks, although it used many of the latter's components. First of all, it only used a slightly modified chassis from the M3 Lee car. When designing the M4 Sherman, the emphasis was mainly on the role of an infantry support vehicle, and not on fighting enemy tanks - this was the role of American tank destroyers. Only possible clashes with the Pz.Kpfw III and Pz.Kpfw IV tanks were hypothesized. A significant role was also played in the mass production of the new tank and the lowest possible production costs. The result was a tank with good armament for 1942 and early 1943, medium armor, but with a sloping frontal plate, but also with poor maneuverability and - especially in the early versions - very susceptible to fire following impact in the compartment motor. At the same time, however, a tank was created that could be truly large-scale in production and had considerable modernization potential. Many development versions were created during the series production M4 Sherman. Chronologically the first was the M4A1 version which already had cast armor. Another - M4A2 - had welded armor and a new General Motors 6460 engine with 375-410 hp, but much less prone to fire. A version of the M4A3 also appeared, armed with a 105 mm howitzer and powered by a Ford GAA engine with a capacity of 450 hp. Based on the M4A3 version, two sub-versions were created: the M4A3E2 Jumbo with reinforced armor and the M4A3E8 with the HVSS and 76mm cannon. An interesting development version was also the T34 Calliope with turret-mounted unguided missiles. The M4 Sherman was also supplied in large numbers to the British and Red Army. The former developed a version of the Firefly based on it, with a large 17-pounder anti-tank gun. During World War II, M4 Sherman tanks fought in North Africa (1942-1943), Italy (1943-1945), during the battles in Normandy, France and West Germany (1944-1945), but also in the Pacific or in the ranks The Red Army on the Eastern Front. After World War II, the M4 Sherman was used in many countries, including Argentina, Belgium, India, Israel, Japan, Pakistan, and Turkey. It also took part in many post-1945 conflicts, including the 1965 Indo-Pakistani War and the 1967 Six-Day War.
Italeri 7520 M4a3e2 "Jumbo" Fast Assembly Scala 1:72

ITALERI

Italeri 7520 M4a3e2 "Jumbo" Fast Assembly Scala 1:72

Italeri 7520 M4a3e2 "Jumbo" Fast Assembly 1:72 scale. Detailed assembly kit with simplified assembly ideal for wargames and dioramas. The M4 Sherman was an American medium tank of World War II. The first prototypes were built in 1941 and series production was carried out in the period 1942-1945. In total, approximately 49,000 copies of this tank of all versions were created, which makes it one of the most produced tanks of the Second World War and the most important tank in the equipment of the Allied armies during this conflict. The M4 Sherman was powered by a single-engine version of the M4A1 Continental R 975 C4 with an output of 400 hp. The vehicle was armed with, depending on the version, a single 75 mm M3 cannon or a 76 mm M1 cannon or a 105 mm M4 howitzer and two 7.62 mm Browning1919A machine guns. The M4 Sherman was developed as a successor to the M2 and M3 tanks, although it used many of the latter's components. First of all, it only used a slightly modified chassis from the M3 Lee car. When designing the M4 Sherman, the emphasis was mainly on the role of an infantry support vehicle, and not on fighting enemy tanks - this was the role of American tank destroyers. Only possible clashes with the Pz.Kpfw III and Pz.Kpfw IV tanks were hypothesized. A significant role was also played in the mass production of the new tank and the lowest possible production costs. The result was a tank with good armament for 1942 and early 1943, medium armor, but with a sloping frontal plate, but also with poor maneuverability and - especially in the early versions - very susceptible to fire following impact in the compartment motor. At the same time, however, a tank was created that could be truly large-scale in production and had considerable modernization potential. Many development versions were created during the series production M4 Sherman. Chronologically the first was the M4A1 version which already had cast armor. Another - M4A2 - had welded armor and a new General Motors 6460 engine with 375-410 hp, but much less prone to fire. A version of the M4A3 also appeared, armed with a 105 mm howitzer and powered by a Ford GAA engine with a capacity of 450 hp. Based on the M4A3 version, two sub-versions were created: the M4A3E2 Jumbo with reinforced armor and the M4A3E8 with the HVSS and 76 mm cannon. An interesting development version was also the T34 Calliope with turret-mounted unguided missiles. The M4 Sherman was also supplied in large numbers to the British and Red Army. The former developed a version of the Firefly based on it, with a large 17-pounder anti-tank gun. During World War II, M4 Sherman tanks fought in North Africa (1942-1943), Italy (1943-1945), during the battles in Normandy, France and West Germany (1944-1945), but also in the Pacific or in the ranks The Red Army on the Eastern Front. After World War II, the M4 Sherman was used in many countries, including Argentina, Belgium, India, Israel, Japan, Pakistan, and Turkey. It also took part in many post-1945 conflicts, including the 1965 Indo-Pakistani War and the 1967 Six-Day War.